Educating Your Child Abroad: Three Things to Consider

Making the choice to pack up and live abroad, either for a short amount of time or indefinitely is a huge decision. It’s big when you make that choice and you’re on your own, but if you happen to have kids then there are plenty of other things you’ll need to consider and prepare for. One of the biggest priorities will be to figure out schooling in your new home. This is a little easier if the country you are moving to speaks the same language as you and your family, but if not, then it adds another layer into the mix.

So, rather than take the wait and see approach, and just figure it all out when you arrive, here are some things you can consider now before you even leave for your new home.

Look Into Local International Schools

For many people, living abroad is an exciting prospect because they will get to learn about a different culture, take in all the sights and scenery, and even learn a new language. What this means for kids, however, is that enrolling them in the local public school system probably won’t be ideal. They will be sitting there completely lost since they don’t speak the language.

This is exactly why international schools are so popular. They will keep up with all your child’s regular curriculum, but they also tend to feature language lessons as well. To top it off, your child will be able to meet others who have moved to that country from around the world and are going through the same sorts of experiences.

What you may not realize is that these international schools start as early as nursery school. Take a look at The Apple Tree, an international nursery Bangkok, Thailand as an example. This is a preschool and nursery school located in Bangkok using the British Early Years curriculum. As an added tip, it’s a good idea to also book a tour of any school you may be considering. The Apple Tree encourages parents to come in, take a look around, and speak to the teachers before making any sort of decision.

Are You Moving Mid-School Year?

Another thing to consider is the timing of your move. Ideally, it would be best to move during summer break so as not to disrupt your child’s school year, but that’s just not always possible. If you are moving mid-school year, you’ll need to check with the school in advance to be sure they are taking new registrants.

Proximity to the School

Finally, when it comes to looking for your new home or apartment, take into consideration how far it will be from your child’s school. Obviously, you want the commute to and from school to be as smooth and short as possible while still living in a comfortable and safe community.

Going About it in a Methodical Way

Going about the move in a methodical way and thinking through each step of the school process can help you to make the best decision for your child and their educational future.

 

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